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By Paul McLane 6/29/2011 12:01 PM
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By Paul McLane 6/20/2011 2:33 PM
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By Paul McLane 6/20/2011 10:09 AM
I've written before and I'll say it again: radio and music labels would advance their respective self-interests far more efficiently if they would learn to really work together rather than snarling at each other over the carcass of the performance royalty...
By Paul McLane 6/16/2011 2:57 PM

 Its findings seem unlikely to create major change in the political calculus or in industry opinion about the key issues.

By Charles Fitch 6/2/2011 5:15 PM
Charles “Buc” Fitch is a frequent contributor to Radio World.

Tornados. Earthquakes. Tsunamis. Hurricanes.

Events of this magnitude, abroad and at home, remind us that when catastrophes happen, we generally don’t handle them well. It doesn’t...

6/29/2011 4:01:00 PM

Broadcaster will use Sage gear and start with 246 units

 

 

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6/20/2011 6:33:00 PM

Statewide systems exist in various forms

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6/20/2011 2:09:00 PM


I've written before and I'll say it again: radio and music labels would advance their respective self-interests far more efficiently if they would learn to really work together rather than snarling at each other over the carcass of the performance royalty debate or happily pointing out each other's revenue numbers each time they decline.

So count me as pleased with a blog essay by Mike Agovino that appears in TechCrunch. He's the COO of Triton Media Group and writes a paragraph that encapsulates what I feel and have long felt: "The audience will continue to migrate online and radio brands need to make sure they exist where and how the audience wants them. Radio and record labels need to find business models that build value for both industries in this new world. Negotiations between the two have been on and off for years now with no resolution in sight. The music industry, broadcasters, artists and consumers are going to continue to take it on the chin if we can’t get these problems resolved. The future for both is better together than apart."

Hear, hear.

Agovino, a former exec at Katz, Interep and Clear Channel Radio, suggests an over-the-air royalty that starts at 1% of revenue and escalates to 5% over 10 years, plus a new arrangement of streaming fees that start at 25% and go down to 5% over a decade. But whether or not you agree with his specific proposal, it's hard to fault the underlying assumptions about the future that he makes in his well-written piece.

Paul McLane is Radio World U.S. Editor in Chief.

 

 

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6/16/2011 6:57:00 PM

 Its findings seem unlikely to create major change in the political calculus or in industry opinion about the key issues.

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6/2/2011 9:15:00 PM

Charles “Buc” Fitch is a frequent contributor to Radio World.

Tornados. Earthquakes. Tsunamis. Hurricanes.

Events of this magnitude, abroad and at home, remind us that when catastrophes happen, we generally don’t handle them well. It doesn’t take much to break down our systems of civilization.

As a personal observation, I contrast us in the United States with the citizenry of Japan. That country has a populace of resilient, disciplined people of action. After their recent natural disasters, for the most part they suffered, persevered and got on with rescue and recovery.

Here, we seem to have a notable contingent of whiners who don’t seem to be able to do much for themselves but complain. Add in a brew of inept leadership that makes decisions on a CYA basis and those who want to attach “rescue and recovery” to a profit motive, and we could easily end up with Katrina redux in spite of the hard lessons we’ve learned.

We cannot do much about the cows around us, the goofballs in the Middle East and “paralysis by analysis” that we find inside the D.C. beltway. But we can do something about getting our stations in order and readiness to do our part — a very important part, a part of immense value — when we get hit by “the next big thing.”

Experienced, sagely thinkers like Larry Titus, John Bisset and other RW contributors have logged in about preparation in previous articles. I’d like to add my experience to this litany with an emphasis on Big Disaster Planning.

The first time I really got into this weighty issue was in 1970 when I attended disaster planning meetings on the Big Island of Hawaii. We were one of only four radio stations on the island.

We recognized the following emergency events that could seriously affect the populace, in descending order:

Tsunami
Hurricane
Violent volcanic eruption with resulting unpredictable lava flows
Pestilence (this included plague, rampant disease, water quality issues, etc.)
Invasion (including fallout)

(Pestilence was not a joke but a real fear. When you’re on an island, you’re in an incubator. Half the indigenous Hawaiian population had been wiped out by diseases brought by missionaries.)

We f

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