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By Paul McLane 9/23/2013 9:02 AM
Larry Wilkins, CPBE, published the following in the Alabama Broadcasters Association Engineering Notebook newsletter. I found it helpful and wanted to share, with his permission. While the FCC has relaxed a number of rules concerning logs, the requirement...
By Paul McLane 9/12/2013 11:02 AM
Frameworks are being built under which our industry at large will enjoy a longer-term, fruitful relationship with content creators.
By Paul McLane 9/11/2013 6:19 PM
He writes, 'We need to have not only overall coordination of information, but coordination for the release of that information.'
9/11/2013 1:36 PM
In our fast-moving times, with high-sugar diets, the attention span of preoccupied gnats and Twitterized communications, maybe it was just a matter of time before the events of Sept. 11, 2001, started to fade. Perhaps the more miraculous thing is that they...
9/6/2013 12:52 PM
Now that I’ve successfully gotten your attention … a follow-up to “NBA Names Scholarship Winners.” ...
9/6/2013 8:37 AM
As anyone even remotely aware of sports knows, it’s football season. Not preseason but the actual season. For the pros it started yesterday evening, officially, with the Ravens in Denver to play the Broncos. College football started last week. This past...

9/23/2013 1:02:00 PM

Larry Wilkins, CPBE, published the following in the Alabama Broadcasters Association Engineering Notebook newsletter. I found it helpful and wanted to share, with his permission.


While the FCC has relaxed a number of rules concerning logs, the requirement to maintain a “Station Log” is still in effect.

The station log must contain the following items:

1. Entries indicating the proper reception, relay and/or origination of all required local/national EAS tests and alerts.

a) Stations should receive and log a Required Weekly Test (RWT) each week from both required monitor sources and IPAWS.
b) Stations should originate/log a Required Weekly Test (RWT) each week.
c) Stations should receive/relay and log the Required Monthly Test (RMT).

2. Entries indicating the proper operation of all tower lights and include notes concerning any outage.

a) Stations should observe the proper operation of the tower lights once every 24 hours either visually or electronically, unless an automatic monitor system is installed to alert personnel of a tower light failure.

3. Entries concerning any out-of-tolerance conditions with the transmission equipment and corrective actions taken.

All stations are required to designate a person to serve as the “Chief Operator” along with an alternate Chief Operator.

The station logs are required to be reviewed by the Chief Operator weekly for correct entries. Upon completion of the review, the chief operator must date and sign the log, initiate any corrective action which may be necessary and advise the station licensee of any condition which is repetitive.

These Station Logs must be retained for a period of two (2) years. Sample station log available here (PDF).

Thanks, Larry, for your good work in support of the radio engineering and management community.


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9/12/2013 3:02:00 PM
Frameworks are being built under which our industry at large will enjoy a longer-term, fruitful relationship with content creators.
Continue Reading     Comments        
9/11/2013 10:19:00 PM
He writes, 'We need to have not only overall coordination of information, but coordination for the release of that information.'
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9/11/2013 5:36:00 PM

In our fast-moving times, with high-sugar diets, the attention span of preoccupied gnats and Twitterized communications, maybe it was just a matter of time before the events of Sept. 11, 2001, started to fade. Perhaps the more miraculous thing is that they stuck around in vivid memory as long as they did. Perhaps this is inevitable. After all, another “day that will live infamy,” one that scarred a prior generation, isn’t even a fuzzy memory for millions of us but a vague historical reference.

Everyone promises “We won’t forget,” but eventually we do.

I sense the shift while noting how local radio covers the anniversaries. For instance, listening to Washington’s WTOP this morning, as I always do (except, ironically, on the actual Sept. 11), I was a bit perturbed by “We’ll never forget” promises that felt robotic to me, delivered with a strange lack of context. The words “terrorism,” “terrorist,” “attack,” and the names of perpetrators such as Atta or bin Laden were wholly absent in the coverage I heard. The vibe I got was that a bunch of people, some of whom might have been “heroes” of some kind, had died 12 years earlier; and we must not forget them, whoever they were; exactly how or why they died wasn’t explored here. The few personal, brief, remembrances I did hear were along the lines of “my husband died. I’m sad. I won’t forget.” Then onto the next thing.

Illustrating the anodyne effort were two “moments of silence” as the station acknowledged the exact moments that the planes hit their targets (though I didn’t hear newsreaders actually use that phrase, or anything like it). These moments of silence consumed all of four or five seconds of air time; one cut jarringly into an ad about cybersecurity. I didn’t hear the station replay programming from 9/11, not even the first halting news excerpts when confusion reigned. I listened for only about 90 minutes this morning, though it was during the exact period of the day when you’d expect the most and best coverage, analysis and memories; but I heard very little.

I guess I expected more. WTOP, owned by Hubbard Radio, is considered the gold standard of all-news stations round here; and 9/11 was not just a national but a very local story in our market. But the vividness, the cutting pain of that day are no lo

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9/6/2013 4:52:00 PM
Now that I’ve successfully gotten your attention … a follow-up to “NBA Names Scholarship Winners.”
Continue Reading     Comments        
9/6/2013 12:37:00 PM
As anyone even remotely aware of sports knows, it’s football season. Not preseason but the actual season. For the pros it started yesterday evening, officially, with the Ravens in Denver to play the Broncos. College football started last week.

This past week the Radio World inbox has been filled with press releases touting sports radio’s coverage of the sport — not just on game day but practically every day. It would seem that there are few places in America where one cannot receive some kind of football programing.

WestwoodOne, formerly Dial Global, has 51 prime time (Monday, Thursday or Sunday night) regular season games available including last night’s game. It has 34 Sunday afternoon games and a Thanksgiving Day doubleheader.

It also has all of the playoff games and the Super Bowl along with supporting preview, wrap-up and analysis programs. WestwoodOne says it has been broadcasting NFL games for four decades.

A bit newer and with a larger menu is satcaster SiriusXM. It boasts that it has “every NFL game.” Naturally there will be supporting news, pregame, wrap and analysis shows. In addition there is a dedicated channel, SiriusXM NFL Radio, filled with pro football talk shows 24/7/365. Populating that channel is a plethora of ex-players, ex-executives and supposed experts. And John Madden is on SiriusXM.

Of course all that football goodness does require a SiriusXM subscription but between the satellite coverage and its app, there aren’t many corners on the planet that football would be unavailable.

ESPN Radio, thinking of itself as the champion of sports radio, or at least the granddaddy of sports radio, will be airing play-by-play of select out-of-market games. In addition to the live coverage will be news, preview, wrap and analysis shows staffed with ex-players, ex-coaches, assorted journalists and the large number of sports talk show hosts that ESPN Radio has nationally and at its local affiliates. Of course those local affiliates will be airing sports talk programing through the week, as will the national shows.

ESPN also has a large number of football program podcasts it makes available including some on fantasy football.

One of the recent entrants to the sports radio huddle is CBS Sports Radio. Of course it wouldn’t be caught dead without some kind of football prog
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