LPFM Applications Are Now Online


Dan Slentz, a Radio World contributor, is also an LPFM applicant and has been blogging about the experience.
 
Yesterday the FCC published all the applicants for LPFM construction permits. This happened in near-record time. Considering the more recent events of the government (namely the shutdown), this was quite an achievement.

Below is a link to the FCC’s search form in the Consolidated Database System or CDBS. The form is easy to use. The more criteria you enter, the longer the search. (Note, no need to hit refresh; a LOT of data is being searched and it does take a few minutes). Naturally LPFM is the main item required to search; I also went to my state to narrow it down, though there were about 60 applications for Ohio so it took a few minutes.

This is good information for LPFM applicants because it can give you a sense of how you stand in the application process. IF you’ve done your homework and had solid engineering, plus you’ve followed the rules for applying, AND you have no competing applications for your frequency in your area, your prospects for a construction permit being granted just went from “fair” to “great!”

With the Ohio search, as an interesting note, I see that (to no huge surprise) probably over half the applications were for major market areas; Cleveland, Columbus and Cincy ranked highest. Also plenty of middle markets like Akron and Canton and major-market suburbs. One other thing that was noticeable (though not unexpected) was it appeared that many applications were from religious organizations. A little surprisingly was seeing some city governments had applied for LPFMs. This is certainly within the rules; I just hadn’t expected to see any for some reason.

Here’s the quick link if you want to check out your application and where you might stand with your LPFM.

Remember, there are no guarantees that you will get a CP at this point, but this does indicate if you might be stand-alone for your CP or who you might need to be negotiating with on making future modifications on your application (or possibly sharing a frequency with).

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