Stations Help Wounded Soldiers, Bullied Students

Anyone involved with nationally syndicated radio knows how difficult it is to make it sound spontaneous and compelling, while injecting enough local elements to engender familiarity and create loyalty.

Anyone involved with nationally syndicated radio knows how difficult it is to make it sound spontaneous and compelling, while injecting enough local elements to engender familiarity and create loyalty.

“The Bobby Bones Show” is first-in-class when it comes to delivering the goods.

“The Bobby Bones Show” built a home for wounded Air Force captain Nathan Nelson and his family.

Here’s more proof of how the show stimulates goodwill: During his third tour in Afghanistan, U.S. Air Force Capt. Nathan Nelson was paralyzed from the chest down. After sharing Nelson’s story on-air, Bobby announced that proceeds from a special T-shirt would help to build a customized “smart home” for Nelson and his family. Listeners responded quickly, helping to raise $100,000!

Since 2014, apparel sales have enabled “The Bobby Bones Show” to raise more than $1 million for great causes. In an announcement about the program, Bones was quoted: “Our listeners have shown us again just how big their hearts are.”

In another example of “Radio Doing Good,” look what radio can accomplish in just 12 hours:

In Manchester and Portsmouth, N.H., WGIR(AM) and WQSOO(FM) with WNN(FM) and WEMJ(AM) teamed up for the third annual “Make 12 Hours Count” radiothon. They raised $140,000 for Veterans Count, which provides financial aid and resources to New Hampshire veterans, service members and their families.

“The effort that our listeners and sponsors put into this event is truly remarkable,” said Joe Graham, market president for iHeartMedia New Hampshire, in a press release. “It’s great to see the New Hampshire community come together to help our local veterans.”

And when New York’s Education Department reported a 19-percent increase in bullying in the city’s public schools and a 31 percent increase in charter schools, WINS(AM) jumped into action.

The station produced an eight-part series called “Living in Live Time” and a related campaign called “I Decide Today,” addressing cyberbullying. Listeners will hear from dozens of experts, kids and celebrities. Two young women who had plastic surgery specifically because of how they looked in selfies were also interviewed concerning the subject.

News Director Ben Mevorach believes “Living in Live Time” could be used in schools as a discussion starter in families with teens and tweens.

Share your story by emailing ereigart@nbmedia.com.



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