Two Beasley Stations Still Off the Air in Ft. Myers

A new transmitter will be needed to put WXKB and WWCN back to normal
Beasley Media Group, Hurricane Irma, Paula Street, Flash Morgan, Bobby Rich, Mason Dixon, WRBQ
L-R: WRBQ, Tampa, midday host Paula Street, afternoon host Flash Morgan, morning co-host /traffic reporter Bobby Rich and morning host Mason Dixon work together getting out Hurricane Irma news.

This story was updated Sept. 12 at 4 p.m.

Here’s the latest update from Beasley Media Group on how its Florida stations are faring in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma.

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The corporate office in Naples did not experience flooding. However, downed trees and branches are being removed, and a generator is providing power. Vice President of Engineering/CTO Mike Cooney and Corporate Network Manager Director Ron Randall are doing final testing on systems and hope to make the office accessible for the rest of the staff by the end of the week. The corporate team is working remotely in the interim.

Two Beasley stations in Ft. Myers — WXKB(FM) and WWCN(FM) — are currently off the air. The engineering team plans to install a new transmitter in Fort Myers starting tomorrow morning. The studio building has some minor damage, but is in relatively good condition.

Tampa had the least challenges. In fact, the studios are in normal condition and running on regular electric services. All Beasley stations there are now on the air, and WLLD is back on the air playing music and providing updates.

 

And as of late Tuesday afternoon, Beasley reports that: 

  • •  There is a limited staff in the corporate office in Naples. Things are running on generators.
  • •  In Ft. Myers, WXKB is back on the air, joining all full power stations.
  • •  In Tampa, all the stations are on the air and studios are in normal condition and running on regular electric services. 
  • •  In Boca Raton, the studio is still experiencing a power outage. WSBR(AM) is running repeat programming and working is being done at transmitter sites.

 

 


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