Wired for Sound

Who Put the Gory in Category?
4.30.2007
I’ve spend more than a few columns in the past extolling the virtues of Category 5 premise/data cables. And more than a few readers have taken the plunge and are using it not just as data cable but also for things like RS-422 and RS-485 machine control, digital audio or even analog audio. More

Who Put the Zip in Speaker Wire?
4.30.2007
Well, I’ve been writing this column for almost four years. You’d think I would run out of things to say about wire and cable. More

Resistance Is Futile
4.30.2007
Fellow "Star Trek" fans will no doubt recognize the Borg title of our column. But the resistance I’m going to talk about is the resistance in speaker cables. More

A Re-Volting Idea for Speakers
4.30.2007
In the Aug. 15 issue, we began a discussion on 70-volt distributed loudspeaker systems...This approach uses transformers inside the power amp, and on each speaker, to change the impedance of the system so the resistance of the wire has much less effect. More

Speaking of Speaker Cable
4.30.2007
We’ve been talking about speaker cable and have covered resistance and capacitance in past columns, which are also posted in the Wired for Sound index page. More

Are You a Data Commander?
4.30.2007
Today’s headline recalls Commander Data, the android on the TV series "Star Trek: The Next Generation."...I recently toured Paramount Studios and saw workers building the sets for the coming Star Trek movie "Nemesis." I also had a chance to see some of the sets for the "Enterprise" TV series. More

Is This Cat Really a Dog?
4.30.2007
So we arrive at the emerging Cat-6...As of this writing, the TIA/EIA 568 committee is on Draft 10a. How many drafts until they are finished? Well, it took until Draft 14 to finish work on Category 5e, so don't hold your breath. More

Data Cables, Moving Audio Around
4.30.2007
We left the subject of "category" cables in the April 24 issue, talking about return loss. More

USB & FireWire, Fired Up for Data
4.30.2007
Both of these trademarked protocols use "plug-and-play" architecture - you can attach or disconnect devices while the network is running. More

From Regular to Super Graphics
4.30.2007
We left our July 3 column talking about VGA (video graphics) cables and RGB (red, green, blue) cables. These are multiple coaxes used to display progressive-scan computer monitors or analog component video, respectively. More

Previous Next