New EAS? Not for Me

Every time modernization is adopted, it cost an absolute fortune; but the "modern equipment" simply fails more often.
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Every time modernization is adopted, it cost an absolute fortune; but the "modern equipment" simply fails more often.

This EAS modernization ("You Need Not Fear the CAP" by Jerry LeBow, Aug. 12) is a joke, something the FCC has been sold on by suppliers.

This list grows every year: Conelrad to EBS to EAS, AM stereo, HD Radio, digital from analog; it's all baloney, simply hype at the owners' expense.

This whole EAS situation can be handled simply by using the NWS system already in place. The $40 weather radios being sold now will analyze information, determine what information you want based on preprogramming and deliver great audio quality, once again for $40. But no, manufacturers want us to spend three to four thousand dollars on junk.

During Hurricane Katrina my little station ran circles around the big stations, gathering information and delivering information, all without a failed-state EAS.

I don't buy the sales pitch. The basic problem with EAS is simple: It's too complicated, and the primary stations fail to deliver information.

The new EAS will fail as the old EAS has.

Harry Hoyler
KKAY(AM)
General Manager
White Castle, La.


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