MPR to Distribute Its Own Programs, Again - Radio World

MPR to Distribute Its Own Programs, Again

MPR to Distribute Its Own Programs, Again
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Listeners to public radio programs like "A Prairie Home Companion" and "Marketplace" will be hearing a new name in their programs' credits: American Public Media.
Earlier this year, Minnesota Public Radio decided to cut out the middleman in the familiar distribution setup for MPR-produced programs. That middleman was Public Radio International.
Originally called American Public Radio, MPR set up the company years ago to distribute its programming and then spun it off.
MPR's board has now decided to bring national production and distribution activities back under its own umbrella.
Now MPR has introduced a new division called American Public Media, that will produce and distribute the national programs that had been distributed by PRI. For most MPR programs, the change took effect today (July 1), although PRI will continue to distribute "Marketplace" and "Marketplace Morning Report" for another year.
PRI continues to exist, distributing other programs such as "The World." PRI is also the only distributor for BBC radio programming in this country.
"The name American Public Media will help distinguish Minnesota Public Radio's national programs from its regional radio services," the organization stated.
MPR President Bill Kling said, "This name change for our national programming more clearly identifies our programming." MPR said the launch of APM will not affect MPR's regional radio service.
"The name Minnesota Public Radio, when applied to national programs, has been confusing to some listeners, funders and the media in locations beyond the Midwest," the organization also stated.
"American Public Media will be a Minnesota entity. However, the new name will make it easier for us to attract national funders and national attention for our programs."
The change means public radio stations now buy programming from three entities, rather than two: NPR, PRI and now MPR.

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