The New Public File: Clear Channel Develops Electronic Storage & Management System - Radio World

The New Public File: Clear Channel Develops Electronic Storage & Management System

The New Public File: Clear Channel Develops Electronic Storage & Management System
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Clear Channel Radio said it has developed a way for its stations to keep their FCC Public Files up to date electronically. It says surprise commission audits have confirmed the system's proficiency as a replacement to the current public file.
LAN International, owned by Clear Channel Worldwide, will offer to sell the product to stations owned by other owners later this year.
Clear Channel created the Electronic Public Inspection System to maintain documents for on-demand, public viewing from its main studio locations.
In comments to RW Online, Jeff Littlejohn, executive VP of distribution development for radio, characterized the product as similar to an electronic filing cabinet, making it easier to store and access documents.
Documents are scanned, then converted into electronic files that can be stored, and added locally or remotely to a station, a market or the entire company using a Web-based interface. The public can print files from individual kiosk machines located at Clear Channel main studios.
Automatic e-mails remind users of upcoming deadlines, the company said.
Surprise FCC audits conducted in Anchorage, Davenport, Denver, Macon, Springfield and Toledo confirmed E-PIF's proficiency as a replacement to the current Public File, Clear Channel said.
The next phase of the in-house initiative will be to offer the system to non-Clear Channel stations by the fourth quarter. LAN International hopes to unveil the product at the September NAB Radio Show in Dallas.
It will sell E-PIF as part of the Viero line of spot scheduling and inventory management products.
LAN International President/CEO Sharon Blankenship said, "The ROI on the product is demonstrable and we will offer flexible options such as barter and/or cash based on customer preference."

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