PxPixel
Getting Data Up the Hill - Radio World

Getting Data Up the Hill

A new eBook from Radio World
Author:
Publish date:
2018-06-29

The payloads that radio broadcasters must move to and from their transmitter sites have grown dramatically in the 21st century. The technology industry has kept pace, offering a broadening array of data transport options to carry those loads.

How should technical managers take advantage of increased bandwidth for digital content, monitoring and control while doing so reliably and economically? What new solutions are available? How can engineers assess cost, reliability, audio performance and suitability for single-frequency networks? What are the IP connections involved; how are engineers sending composite baseband at low bandwidth? What role do HD Radio secondary channels play?

This free eBook explores such questions and more. Read it here.

Related

Broadcasters Get Smart With Apps ebook

Broadcasters Get Smart With Apps

The availability of apps is changing the way radio engineers approach their job. From automation and processors to transmitters, remote control and outside broadcasting, apps today put control in the palm of one’s hand and contribute to the operation and management of all aspects of a radio broadcast infrastructure.

The Modern Radio Studio ebook cover

The Modern Radio Studio

What does it take in the 21st century to design and build an efficient, cost-effective, forward-looking radio studio? The latest Radio World International eBook, “The Modern Radio Studio,” discusses issues broadcasters need to consider when refitting an entire network, or building a large or small single radio station. It provides examples of successful studio builds as well as offering tips from top global radio technologists about how to best plan or modernize one’s facilities, and more.

AM Translators: What's Next? ebook cover

AM Translators: What's Next?

Stay on top of developments in this rapidly expanding segment of the U.S. radio broadcast industry. The sector is fast-moving — and FM translator planning is a whole topic in itself.