Wanted: Digital Media Engineer - Radio World

Wanted: Digital Media Engineer

Paul McLane is editor in chief of Radio World U.S.If you’re a technical guy or gal who knows how to talk digital, NAB may want a word with you.The National Association of Broadcasters has an opening posted on its website
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Paul McLane is editor in chief of Radio World U.S.

If you’re a technical guy or gal who knows how to talk digital, NAB may want a word with you.

The National Association of Broadcasters has an opening posted on its website for a digital media engineer.

The person will report to the senior VP of science and technology. Duties: to provide engineering assistance on assigned radio and TV engineering matters and industry technical and regulatory affairs; analyze technically oriented policy documents; represent the association on technical matters before groups like the FCC; contribute to NAB publications; and other such.

Sound like you? Sound like fun? You’ll need a BSEE or equivalent, five years or more working with digital media communication technology and a working knowledge of digital communications engineering. You also need to be able to express yourself well.

Knowing the interest RW readers may have in this, I asked NAB for a bit more info, such as whether this is a newly created position and whether the word “digital” refers to traditional broadcasting or online tools. The answer: Both.

“We're looking for an engineer who can fully participate in digital TV, digital radio and spectrum issues, as well as help broadcasters exploit other digital media platforms,” spokesman Kris Jones told me. He said this position takes the place of one left by Graham Jones, NAB senior director of communications engineering, who recently retired (and whom you may know as a co-author of NAB Engineering Handbooks). The NAB Science & Technology department currently has five “excellent engineers,” Kris Jones added.

You can send a cover letter with salary history and résumé to HR@nab.org. Include the title of the position in the subject line.

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