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TV Tests Planned at 1 World Trade - Radio World

TV Tests Planned at 1 World Trade

GatesAir is among those participating
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Testing begins soon of over-the-air television broadcasting from atop the new One World Trade Center in lower Manhattan. Results are expected in February.

The Durst Organization manages the 1,776-foot skyscraper and leases out its space. As we’ve reported, it hopes to attract television and radio stations to transmit from atop the building, returning broadcasters to the southern tip of Manhattan, where transmission facilities were destroyed in the 2001 terror attacks.

The new tower has capacity for a master RF system; construction on that would proceed if Durst secures enough commitments from broadcasters to participate. Durst has said it could accommodate up to 11 TV and 21 FM signals. No commitments have yet been announced.

GatesAir said it is supplying Maxiva UHF and VHF transmitters for these TV tests. “The testing of the One World Trade Center antenna system, positioned at 1,700 feet above ground, will allow broadcasters to perform a complete market coverage analysis as they consider relocation to the new site,” GatesAir said in a statement. The manufacturer said it will aid in installation, commissioning and onsite training as well as performance tests in advance of installation. Its systems will include GatesAir transmitters, exciters and real-time adaptive correction software.

The announcement was made by GatesAir Chief Product Officer Rich Redmond. John Lyons is assistant vice president and director of broadcasting for The Durst Organization.

RFS is the antenna manufacturer of both antennas, Lyons told Radio World; electrical work on the project will be done by Hatzel & Buehler, while rigging will be done by East Coast Hoist.

The tower is the highest skyscraper in the Western Hemisphere.

Related:
1 WTC Prepares for Station Tenants (Dec. 2013)
NYC Rooftop RF Options (Oct. 2014)

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