Reading Services Demand Info From FCC

Reading Services Demand Info From FCC
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The International Association of Audio Information Services is trying to find out from the FCC exactly how low-power FM radio would affect disabled listeners of radio reading services.
The organization has filed a request for information under the Freedom of Information Act about receiver testing.
"After months of silence from the FCC on the subject of tests that were reportedly conducted on specialized broadcast receivers, IAAIS is pushing for answers," the organization said in a statement.
"The result of these tests could have serious financial consequences for nonprofit radio reading services across the county," IAAIS President Ben Martin stated.
"We need to be in a position to advise our members about the capacity of the receivers they currently have in use and on purchase recommendations for future equipment."
IAAIS said it is not against LPFM in concept, but that it wants to protect the information services its members provide for people who are print-disabled.
Interference to specialized FM subcarrier radios used by the visually impaired is one objection raised by opponents to the commission's current plan to license new LPFM stations.
IAAIS said the FCC did not test SCA receivers before authorizing LPFM; and that in spite of multiple requests, the results of those tests it finally did conduct "are being kept secret inside the FCC."

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“It’s worrisome because it sets a precedent,” said Heather Lusignan, immediate past president of IAAIS. Reading service organizers say the OPB decision ignores the needs of older, visually-impaired, less technology-literate people.