Madagascar World Voice Is New Shortwave Station

It’s the second SW signal from World Christian Broadcasting
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World Christian Broadcasting launched its second shortwave station, Madagascar World Voice, on Easter Sunday in late March.

The nonprofit organization is based near Nashville, Tenn. Station KNLS launched in 1983. (Shown: About 100 people gathered at headquarters in Franklin, Tenn., for the event. According to the ministry’s website, a three-way Skype transmission enabled colleagues at the Programming Center in Tennessee and at KNLS in Anchor Point, Alaska, to see what was happening at the new station.)

President/CEO Charles H. Caudill announced the launch. “More than 10 years of planning and work have gone into making Madagascar World Voice a reality,” he said in a statement. “With both our stations, we can now reach most of the world with the Good News.”

WCB said the new Madagascar World Voice airs 13 hours daily in Arabic, African English, International English, Mandarin Chinese, Russian and Spanish. The signals will reach Africa and the Middle East, and most of Europe and South America.

“Each language service produces a daily, one-hour magazine-style program with Gospel teaching segments, news features and music, each of which is broadcast both on radio and the Internet,” it stated.

According to the website, “Within just a few hours we began receiving emails from people all over the world who had picked up the signals from Madagascar,” the organization posted. “We heard from shortwave enthusiasts in Sri Lanka, India, Russia, Finland, Ukraine, Germany, United Arab Emirates, Bulgaria, Italy, Colombia, Sweden, and points in the United States from Massachusetts to California. … One man wrote the touching note that he received his first QSL card from KNLS 30 years ago. ‘You sent me a mini red Bible, which I still have today. I wish you all the best with the new station. 73 and yours in Christ.’”

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This is the second in an occasional series on the stories behind shortwave broadcasting stations in the United States and its territories; it is published in cooperation with the National Association of Shortwave Broadcasters. Some stations are gone and almost forgotten, others can be heard today.