EAS and HD and DRM, Oh My! - Radio World

EAS and HD and DRM, Oh My!

Readers told us what they thought about various regulations
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EAS AIR CHAIN

I just read the article on EAS (“No, Really, This Is Not a Test,” Nov. 19 issue). Mr. Fybush is promoting the idea of EAS distribution out of band so that listeners aren’t desensitized by all the weekly and monthly tests.

The problem I see is that when an actual and very critical alert is originated, how would we know it will make it to the air chain in a timely manner?

At our eight stations I maintain five EAS units. My RWT and RMT filters are programmed to play a pre-recorded message before the squawks that says, “This is a test of the emergency alert system, only a test.” The entire air chain needs to be tested to know it works.

Marlin Jackson, CSTE
Chair, Inland NW LECC / Member, Washington State SECC
Assistant Chief Engineer, RF Systems
The KXLY Broadcast Group
Spokane, Wash.

DRM VS. HD RADIO

I seldom ever comment on any articles, but I felt compelled to comment on two articles in the September issue: John Anderson’s “I Come in Peace,” about HD Radio, and Alan Hughes’ “An Outsider’s Perspective.”

These two men make more sense than anything I have seen about digital. From what I have read about Digital Radio Mondiale, it looks to me like it would be the best route for AM to take.

I operate a 1 kW AM with a translator in a small community. I just don’t see any way that HD Radio would ever be feasible for me. Hopefully someone will see the light and come up with a viable solution.

Sam Thomas
WJTH Radio
Calhoun, Ga.

REGULATORY REACTIONS

About time (“All AMs Must Now Pay Regulatory Fees,” radioworld.com, Sept. 2)! The original station shutdown and fee exemptions should have ended much more quickly — after, say, three years.

Robert Lee
Owner/President
Lee MediaWorks LLC
Abilene, Texas

At this stage, it would appear that there is little or no coordination between agencies in notifying broadcasters of any proposed regulations (“Environmental Agency Regulates Testing,” Nov. 5 issue).

While this could result in yet more burdens for stations, there seem to be some justifiable reasons for inspections and maintenance of polluting (diesel) generators. Would this not also raise the possibility of less emissions by installation of other types of generating equipment — such as propane fueled generators, etc.?

Dave Bull
Retired Engineer
Virginia

HAM INTERFERENCE

I believe I was one of those receiving some of this interference (“FCC Snares Ham Operators,” radioworld.com, July 24). Even if it were not them, it gives me a good deal of pleasure to see this, knowing they were even warned repeatedly yet persisted in this juvenile behavior.

I am also glad to see that the FCC was willing to warn first before dropping the boom on them. This indeed was handled well by the FCC. So I say thank you, FCC, for helping us amateurs keep our frequencies clean.

Brian Heise
Freelance Broadcast Radio Engineer
Heise Broadcast
Sherman/Denison, Texas

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