Lost in Translation

I'd like to address translators and the effects they can have on local stations.
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As I have read, some stations are experiencing tough times. When the economy is down, it can make it really tough on smaller-market stations.

I'd like to address translators and the effects they can have on local stations. I believe translators are good if they are used for the right reasons. But when other stations (and much of the time it is multiple station owners) put in translators with basically the same type of format, this really takes revenue from the local operator.

The translator people don't have multiple families to support in that community or the major investment of a main radio station, yet they are allowed to take a piece of the pie that the local station needs.

I feel that there should be some way that a translator should have to do at least 51 percent different programming than main stations to at least give the local station a fairer playing field.

Mark Taylor
President
Sky High Broadcasting
Neosho, Mo.

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