Commission Reminds Users of 700 MHz Deadline

Deadline to retune or replace is June 12
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
0


A week from Saturday is the deadline for users of wireless mics operating in the 700 MHz band to retune or replace their gear.

The FCC issued a reminder to consumers of the pending transition.

"To avoid interference to public safety communications and next generation commercial services, users of wireless microphones operating in the 700 MHz Band must retune or replace their equipment by June 12, 2010," the commission stated.

"This action helps complete an important component of the DTV Transition by clearing the 700 MHz band and enabling the rollout of communications services for public safety and the deployment of next generation 4G wireless devices for consumers."

The FCC said it wanted to give individuals and groups using unauthorized devices in the 700 MHz band ample time to move to appropriate frequencies, and has been engaging in an "aggressive" consumer outreach plan to educate consumers who had purchased wireless mic systems and devices that use that band.

"As part of this outreach, the FCC now reminds individuals and groups using these devices in the 700 MHz band, either on a licensed on unlicensed basis, to cease operations by the June 12, 2010, deadline," it stated.

"The FCC also reminds users of certain low-power auxiliary stations (such as wireless intercoms and cueing equipment used in the entertainment industry) to stop operations by June 12, 2010, on any of the frequencies in the 700 MHz. Because any operation in violation of these rules creates a danger of interference to important radio communications, users who operate wireless devices in violation of these rules may be subject to monetary forfeitures, seizure of the radio equipment, or criminal sanctions."

It included a link to a list of affected equipment.

Related

Martin: ‘Unlock’ 700 MHz

“Coming soon could be a wireless broadband world in which consumers get to pick any smartphone or other device and load any software on it - not have to take what the wireless carrier wants to sell.”