New Receivers for PRSS Forward to Be Tested

Twenty-five stations will try them out later this year
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Seems like there’s a rush of activity in the public radio engineering sector every year right before NAB, and this year is no exception.

NPR Distribution announced the 25 stations that will participate in the PRSS Forward program to beta-test new SFX4104 Pro Audio receivers. “We received about three times as many applicants as we had spots to fill, and we wish to sincerely thank every station that applied to participate in the program,” the organization said in a statement.

”The stations selected cover all areas of our satellite downlink footprint, including the ‘corners’: Alaska, Maine, southern California and Florida.” Each satellite-interconnected station will receive two receivers this year.

The organization said its engineering team would be in touch with the stations soon. Director of Operations & Engineering Dick Kohles and his team were slated to present details at the PREC conference to give an update about the PRSS Forward project.

The stations that will test the receivers are KUAC Fairbanks, Alaska; KOTZ Kotzebue, Alaska; KJZZ Tempe, Ariz.; KPCC Pasadena, Calif.; KQED San Francisco; KUVO Denver; WAMU Washington; WFSU Tallahassee, Fla.; KBSU Boise, Idaho; KBYI Rexburg, Idaho; WGLT Normal, Ill.; KMUW Wichita, Kan.; WWNO New Orleans; WUOM Ann Arbor, Mich.; KRCU Cape Girardeau, Mo.; KVSC St. Cloud, Minn.; WFAE Charlotte, N.C.; WSLU Canton, N.Y.; WEVO Concord, N.H.; KUNM Albuquerque; KUSD Vermillion, S.D.; WUOT Knoxville, Tenn; KUT Austin, Texas; KPLU Tacoma, Wash.; and KUWR Laramie, Wyo.

Related:
Public Radio System Looks ‘Forward’” (March 2010)

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