Where the Next Generation Will Come From

Brett Moss is gear & technology editor.I’ve got to give Loyalist College of Belleville, Ont., credit. The Canadian school has a Broadcast Engineering Technology degree program and is in the last semester of its first class of “pioneer” broadcast engineers.
Author:
Publish date:


Brett Moss is gear & technology editor.

I’ve got to give Loyalist College of Belleville, Ont., credit. The Canadian school has a Broadcast Engineering Technology degree program and is in the last semester of its first class of “pioneer” broadcast engineers.

It’s just not often you see a new broadcast engineering program. The college’s Web page describing the program notes: “This new, one-of-a-kind program was designed with input from the industry, based on today’s requirements and their expectations of future directions.” And it adds, “Many broadcast engineers are retiring now and in the next several years, creating a great need for new graduates who are trained on the latest systems.”

Real-world broadcast internships with the CBC, CHUM Radio, Corus Entertainment, et al. provide for hands-on experience. Not surprisingly, the program has a component of IT technology.

Eric Heidendahl, professor/coordinator of broadcast engineering for Loyalist College, wrote a commentary in Radio World this month in which he describes broadcast engineering as “a solid career choice for those who are technically inclined; but for now it is a well-kept secret.” Programs like his help get the word out.

The Loyalist program is accredited by SBE, too. Society of Broadcast Engineers Executive Director John Poray tells us that there are now a dozen SBE-certified schools (as well as an SBE tie-in with the U.S. military education program). So the next time someone asks, “Where will the next generation of engineers come from,” you can point them to this list.

Kudos to Loyalist College, and to SBE, for advancing the cause of developing future engineers.

Related

MAB and the Next Generation

Brett Moss is gear & technology editor.The Michigan Association of Broadcasters and its foundation know how to treat their kids. At the recent Great Lakes Broadcasting Conference and Expo, the foundation handed out its 2011 MABF High School and College

Dude, Where’s My AM Tuner?

Brett Moss is gear & technology editor.One of our modern Christmas traditions is the “gadget.” Traditionally the gadget was ever so cool (bonus points if it was “James Bondish”) and usually not particularly useful. And despite its sometimes jack of

Frank, Who ... er, WHERE Are You?

By Gear & Technology Editor Brett MossWhile it might not entail deafeningly loud music, trashing hotel rooms, groupie trains or exotic pharmaceuticals, the Frank Foti 2010 World Tour is starting. Or maybe in the tradition of his idols The Who,

Ruby Anniversary for Equipment Supplier

Brett Moss is gear & technology editor.It’s now known as ProAudio.com, but for anyone in the radio TV broadcast business over the age of 35 or thereabouts, it will always be Crouse Kimzey.What started in the early 1970s in Fort

Vegas Rooms for $22? If You Know Where to Look

Brett Moss is gear & technology editor.For prospective NAB Show attendees, “where to stay” is always an interesting question. Vets know that Las Vegas has a wide variety of hotels, at wildly varying levels of quality. There is also the

Moss: Engineers & Other Sex Gods, Apply Here

Brett Moss is gear & technology editor.Here’s a chance to be famous, idolized and influential (or have rotten tomatoes thrown at you).Let’s face it, most everyone got into radio engineering to be famous, right? So here’s your chance. The National